Sigh…

Another day, another Brent Bozell column lamenting the moral backwardness that is the New York arts scene.
Hey Brent: It’s called the FRINGE Festival for a reason, all right? It is by definition a test of moral boundaries, as theater has always been and always will be. You want safe, predictable pablum, stay home and watch Fox Family Channel.

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3 comments

  1. Alan K. Henderson

    Three obserations:
    1) Bozell has a point about the drama critics who won’t dare criticize the content of any of the “fringe” works but will shout “Infidel!” at the Christian play “Discordant Duets.” The avant weird don’t like it when their stuff gets fisked, but they’re loaded for bear (or loaded for tofu, in the case of PETA apologists) when someone dares to express a traditionalist message in the public square.
    2) Mark and Michelle Bruner are setting a pretty good example of “being in te world and not of it” that more Christians should follow. But I’d rather see them choose venues not funded by the NEA because…
    3) …The government shouldn’t be in the business of funding luxuries such as art (or radio and TV broadcasting).

  2. James Russell

    I don’t suppose there’s any possibility that the Christian play simply was crap, and that Bruce Weber’s comments on it represented a legitimate critical statement as opposed to a display of knee-jerk anti-Christianism?

  3. Clay Waters

    James Russell writes: “I don’t suppose there’s any possibility that the Christian play simply was crap, and that Bruce Weber’s comments on it represented a legitimate critical statement as opposed to a display of knee-jerk anti-Christianism?”
    Weber didn’t just comment on the play; he proudly asserted he walked out in a huff because the message of the play offended his delicate sensibilities. That kind of attitude makes Weber resemble a stereotypical right-wing prude rather than the open-minded theatre critic he no doubt considers himself to be.
    The Fringe Show features plays like “Elephant Titus” (tagline: “General Titus Adronicus returns to Rome with a hideous disfiguring disease, and he’s just nuts about it.”) and “Daddy Kathryn,” (“A comedy about a gay son’s wacky relationship with his newly outed transvestite father.”) But show Weber a pro-Christian work and he gets offended? A strange place to draw the line.
    If Weber was truly open-minded he’d have given the play (no matter how bad) props for being truly radical–a pro-Christian work in the Lowe East side based Fringe festival, instead of the usual boring “outre” work (transvestites, yawn) that’s not even shocking anymore.